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Standards

Australian and New Zealand Glove Standards


AS/NZS 2161:2008 is the standard that covers occupational protective gloves in Australian and New Zealand. This series of standards ensures the correct gloves are chosen and maintained to provide users with effective protection. 



Do Elliotts gloves meet the requirements of Australian Standards for gloves?


Elliotts place a great amount of focus on quality and standards, and have lead the way in Australia and New Zealand promoting the need for gloves to be certified to AS/NZS 2161 standards. Where possible our gloves are Certified by SAI Global to AS/NZS 2161 standards. If the gloves are not certified they are manufactured to meet the requirements of the standards.

 
Elliotts were the first to have our Big Red and Kevlar Blue welding gloves certified by SAI Global to AS/NZS 2161.4.1999 Occupational Gloves for protection against thermal risks (heat and fire), we since then certified our G-Flex Technical Gloves and Mec-Flex Mechanics gloves to AS/NZS 2161.3:2005 - Protection Against Mechanical Risks.
 
 
What are the Most Common Glove Standards?

AS/NZS 2161.3:2005 (EN388) Protection against mechanical risks 

AS/NZS 2161.4:1999 (EN407) Protection against thermal risks (heat and fire) 
AS/NZS 2161.5:1998 (EN511) Protection against cold 
AS 2161.6-2003 Protective gloves for firefighters - Laboratory test methods and performance requirements 
AS/NZS 2161.10.3:2005 (EN 374-3) Determination of resistance to permeation by chemicals

See below for other Australian/ New Zealand Glove Standards
 
 

AS/NZS 2161.2:1998 (EN 420) General Requirements
This standard defines the general requirements and relevant test procedures for all protective gloves and is concerned with the following areas:
* glove design and construction,  * resistance of gloves materials to water penetration, 
* innocuousness, 
* comfort and efficiency, 
* marking and information supplied by the manufacturer.
 


AS/NZS 2161.3:2005 - Protection Against Mechanical Risks (EN388)
 
Mechanical risk is the risk caused by abrasion, blade cut, tear and puncture to the wearer of the glove. A tested item is given a performance rating of 1 to 4 (lowest to highest) on some or all of the listed categories. The 'blade cut resistance' test is an exception as it measures from 1 to 5. Frequently an 'x' will replace one or more of the numbers, this means that the corresponding test was not performed.




 

The performance values assigned against each test factor correspond approximately to the following values.

 

 

Abrasion resistance: How well can the material of the glove resist exposure to repeated abrasion.
Blade cut resistance: How well can the material of the glove resist cutting objects.
Tear resistance: What force is needed to enlarge, by tearing a precut hole in the material of the glove. Puncture resistance: What force is needed to puncture the palm of the glove with a calibrated spike.

 


AS/NZS 2161.4:1999 - Protection against thermal risks (heat and fire)  EN407


This diagram details the testing categories for EN407: 2004. A tested item is given a performance rating of 1 to 4 (lowest to highest) on some or all of the listed categories. Frequently an 'x' will replace one or more of the numbers, this means that the corresponding test was not performed.








 




The following table details the performance levels for the 'contact heat' category:


AS/NZS 2161.5:1998 Protection against cold (EN511)


This diagram details the testing categories for BS EN511: 1994. A tested item is given a performance rating of 1 to 4 (lowest to highest) on some or all of the listed categories. Water Impermeability is an exception in this case, as this test is pass/fail - '1' signifies a pass. Frequently an 'x' will replace one or more of the numbers, this means that the corresponding test was not performed.


 


AS 2161.6-2014 Protective gloves for firefighters. Laboratory test methods and performance requirements
This Standard specifies test methods and minimum requirements for protective gloves to be worn during fire fighting and associated activities where there is a risk of heat and/or flame. This standard supersedes (in part) AS 2161.6—2003.

 

This Standard is based on but not equivalent to ISO 15383:2001, Protective gloves for firefighters—Laboratory test methods and performance requirements.

 

The 2014 revision removed specifications for Type 1 gloves, a change reflected in the new part title of the Standard and to introduce a single level of performance for structural firefighting gloves in place of the previous two level approach (Types 2 and 3). Type 1 gloves will continue to be able to comply with AS 2161.6—2003 until it is withdrawn.

 


EN12477 Protective Gloves for Welders


The standard specifies the requirements and test methods for the gloves used for manual welding of metals, cutting and related techniques. The welder's gloves are classified into two categories. B when a dexterity is required and A for others welding processes.

 


AS/NZS 2161.10.3:2005 (EN 374-3) Determination of resistance to permeation by chemicals


This pictogram is displayed on gloves that comply to penetration and permeation requirements. Gloves that carry this symbol have been successfully tested against at least 3 different chemicals. The pictogram is accompanied by the relevant code letter(s) of these chemicals according to the following chart